Workshop

REFLECTING EUROPEAN ÄNGST – Elisabeth Bakambamba Tambwe

May 3 2019
Zieglergasse 25
1070 Vienna
Phone: +43 1 587 87 7410
15:00
Friday:
15:00-16:00
Pay as you wish
Friday, May 3, 2019
Add to Calendar

Workshop with Elisabeth Bakambamba Tambwe in collaboration with Nazis & Goldmund

Pay as you wish. Please register via ticket link.

In the fourth instalment of the Interspeeches series on May 4th, writers’ collective Nazis & Goldmund will discuss what is attributed and inherent to “European angst”. Aptly, Elisabeth Bakambamba Tambwe analyses our ways of looking and seeing and of segmenting our environment via our perception filters such as gender, age, class or colour of skin in her performance PINK EYE. In the workshop, participants will join Elisabeth Bakambamba Tambwe in dealing with various categorising filters and with how judging gazes can be redirected and disrupted in the sense of a common solidary practice.

The workshop is open to anybody interested and does not require any prior knowledge.

Elisabeth Bakambamba Tambwe, born in Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo, lives and works as a performance artist, choreographer and visual artist in Vienna. She grew up in France and studied Fine Art at the École des Beaux-Arts in the northern French city of Tourcoing. After graduating in 1998, Tambwe began working as a dancer and performer, focussing on the manipulation of bodies in Western Europe and Congo. Her performances staged at the Vienna Dance Festival, the Wiener Festwochen, Tanzquartier Wien and steirischer herbst among other venues, always incorporate the installation-based space created around them. Elisabeth Bakambamba Tambwe also works as a multimedia visual artist. Her most recent exhibition “La Philosophie Banane” was shown at Weltmuseum Wien in 2014.

https://www.elitambwe.com

Nazis & Goldmund describe themselves as a many-headed poetological monster that critically monitors the developments and actions among the European Right and their international alliances, analysing and attacking their narrative strategies and staged interventions.

Foto: Innsbruck International Christa Pertl